Kansas City nurses struggle with mental health post COVID-19

Depression, anxiety, or both. The N95 on the CHELSEA HAN simple blue mask carries a burden. So make sure every sign comes into the sick room of the COVID unit at ADVENT HEALTH SHAWNEE to take care and know death by day, but fatigue has to be rising since May 2020. Only to work for several days. You can feel like doing RDHA YET PEOPLE DDIE every single day, and then get fired and you’re stretched, and how do you notice that FL is like a home failure for your family? It is Fengli quietly frequented by the nurse everywhere. We will continue to see more deaths, and we are still meeting with these nurses to provide care. So, if you’re going to lose nurses to mental health, that’s the drain on them as the pandemic moves into its third year. He really helps us with our day and helps us get cards. Hang near. God still holds out for nursing entry because of PELE and if the other Israeli government is going to take care of people, but the guy who goes into the nursing field is seeing a record burn and that means more work on that.

Nurses struggle with mental health as COVID-19 continues

Some studies show that 50% of nurses say they are depressed, anxious, or both

The pandemic has affected everyone’s mental health. Front-line workers especially feel this. Some studies show that 50% of nurses say they are depressed, anxious, or both. Mental Health America put the number much higher when it conducted a survey in the summer of 2020. 93% of health care workers reported feeling stressed. Chelsea Hahn bears a burden every time she enters a patient room in the Progressive Care Unit, part of the COVID-19 unit, at Advent Health Shawnee Mission. Another burden on Han extends far beyond the hospital walls. Since May of 2020, you have to take depression and anxiety medication every day to come to work. “You feel like you worked so hard a lot of days, and yet people die every day. It’s tense and how you can’t feel like a failure for your family at home,” Han said. “It’s a feeling that quietly reverberates by nurses everywhere. “We will continue to see more deaths, and we will continue to see more disabled due to COVID-19,” explained Kelly Summers, director of the Kansas State Nurses Association. “And we still need these nurses to be there and provide care. The nurses are going to be missing out on mental health; that’s their drain.” As the epidemic enters its third year, Han remains resolute. “I got into nursing because of people. And if you go, who is going to take care of people? The impact you’re going to have on humans, on people, in their lives, every single day, that’s what it’s worth.” Han said. Unlike Han, many go. The nursing field is experiencing record fatigue. This means more work for those who are overworked. The state of Kansas recently approved Spark’s funding for hospitals, which in turn will provide additional funds for frontline workers. The Kansas State Nurses Association reports that nurses in Kansas earn about $60,000 a year — well below the national average of $80,000 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The pandemic has affected everyone’s mental health. Front-line workers especially feel this. Some studies show that 50% of nurses say they are depressed, anxious, or both. Mental Health America put the number much higher when it conducted a survey in the summer of 2020.

93% of healthcare workers reported feeling stressed.

Chelsea Hahn bears a burden every time she enters a patient room in the Progressive Care Unit, part of the COVID-19 unit, at Advent Health Shawnee Mission. Another burden on Han extends far beyond the hospital walls. Since May 2020, she has to take depression and anxiety medication every day to come to work.

“A lot of days you feel like you’ve worked so hard, and yet people die every day. Then you feel overwhelmed and stressed and how you can’t feel like a failure for your family back home,” Han said.

It’s a feeling that is quietly reverberated by nurses everywhere.

“We will continue to see more deaths, and we will continue to see more disabled due to COVID-19,” explained Kelly Summers, director of the Kansas State Nurses Association. “And we still need these nurses to be there and provide care. The nurses are going to be lost because of our mental health; that’s their drain.”

As the epidemic enters its third year, Han remains resolute.

“I got into nursing because of people. And if you go, who is going to take care of people? The impact you’re going to have on humans, on people, in their lives, every single day, that’s what it’s worth.” Han said.

Unlike Han, many go. The nursing field is experiencing record fatigue. This means more work for those who are overworked.

The state of Kansas recently approved Spark’s funding for hospitals, which in turn will provide additional funds for frontline workers. The Kansas State Nurses Association reports that nurses in Kansas earn about $60,000 a year — well below the national average of $80,000 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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