Clarksville nonprofit awarded grant to help youth mental health

Recently, health experts declared children’s mental health a national emergency and to address this crisis here in our region, the BAYA Foundation provides an outlet for Kentuckian girls to overcome these challenges. She can express her inner thoughts. “I wonder how our relationship with my mother can improve,” she said aloud. With massage chairs, salt lamps and aromatherapy filling the air, this program’s holistic approach to helping young girls deal with the daily battles of stress and mental health. “Our children are suffering,” said Tanisha Tesh Frederick, founder of BAYA. “Our African American children are suffering because the parents in our community are like you don’t need treatment.” Frederick aims to continue breaking stigmas surrounding mental health with the help of a $20,000 grant from Kosair charities that will allow her to continue providing care at the Clarksville Center at no cost to girls. There they engage in open and honest conversation, participate in interactive activities focused on mindfulness therapy, and can receive professional help from experts. “Most of them aren’t even shy, like, ‘I need help, can you help with this?'” “This is their safe place and I want them to feel open to speak freely and comfortable to come to us,” Frederick said. “Many deal with struggles in their home lives, bullying at school and violence that plagues their neighborhoods. For Ashlynn, a JCPS student , the BAYA center is a mentally and physically safe place.” “If I’m home doing nothing and I hear gunshots, it’s scary because I don’t know what to do. I’m hesitant, I’m afraid. Frederick said the escalation of gun violence in Louisville is a painful reality for many of her girls and protecting them in every aspect is critical. From mental health awareness to emotional safety, she says it’s all part of her life goal with BAYA. “I want to die empty. I don’t want to die full of potential,” she said. “I want you guys to live your best life, so what does that look like for you?” More information about BAYA and how to engage your child can be found here.

Recently, health experts declared children’s mental health a national emergency and to address this crisis here in our region, the BAYA Foundation provides an outlet for Kentuckian girls to overcome these challenges.

In the soothing decompression room at the BAYA Center, Ashlynn Berry, 14, is able to express her innermost thoughts.

“I wonder how the relationship between me and my mother could improve,” she said out loud.

With massage chairs, salt lamps and aromatherapy filling the air, this holistic approach to the program is to help young girls deal with daily stresses and mental health battles.

Our children are suffering,” said Tanisha Tesh Frederick, founder of BAYA. “Our African American children are suffering because parents in our community are like you don’t need treatment.”

Frederick aims to continue breaking stigmas surrounding mental health with the help of a $20,000 grant from Kosier charities that will allow her to continue providing care at the Clarksville Center at no cost to the girls. There they engage in open and honest conversation, participate in interactive activities focused on healing the mind, and can receive professional help from experts.

“Most of them aren’t even shy, it’s like, ‘I need help, can you help with this?'” And that’s what we’re here for,” said Frederick. “This is their safe place and I want them to feel open to speak freely and at ease to come to us.”

Many deal with struggles in their home lives, bullying at school and violence in their neighbourhoods. For Ashlynn, a JCPS student, the BAYA Center is a mentally and physically safe place.

“If I’m at home doing nothing and I hear gunshots, it’s scary because I don’t know what to do. I’m hesitant, I’m scared. I look at my family members as if you’re all right,” she said.

Frederick says the escalation of gun violence in Louisville is a painful reality for many of her girls and protecting them in every aspect is critical. From mental health awareness to emotional safety, she says it’s all part of her life goal with BAYA.

“I want to die empty. I don’t want to die full of potential,” she said. “I want you guys to live your best, so what does that look like to you?”

More information about BAYA and how to engage your child can be found here.

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